Tuesday, 18 June 2024 00:00

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, poses significant challenges for foot health, stemming from restricted blood flow to the lower extremities. This condition, often caused by atherosclerosis, involves the buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries, leading to narrowed or blocked blood vessels. The diminished blood supply to the feet can result in various symptoms, including pain, cramping, numbness, and weakness, particularly during physical activity. Left untreated, PAD can contribute to serious complications such as foot ulcers, infections, and delayed wound healing. Diagnosing PAD typically involves a comprehensive evaluation by a podiatrist. This process includes a thorough medical history review, assessment of risk factors such as smoking and diabetes, and a physical examination focused on evaluating circulation in the legs and feet. Specialized diagnostic tests, such as ankle-brachial index, or ABI measurement, Doppler ultrasound, and angiography, may also be employed to confirm the diagnosis and determine the extent of arterial blockages. If you are experiencing any of the foot symptoms mentioned above, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose and offer relief solutions for PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Comprehensive Footcare Clinic - Hawaii. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Honolulu, HI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 12 June 2024 00:00

Foot or ankle pain can negatively affect your day-to-day life and can occur due to several different conditions. Pain can also be an indicator of a more serious underlying condition, which is why you should seek professional help as soon as you notice any abnormalities in your feet.

Tuesday, 11 June 2024 00:00

Pressure injuries and diabetic foot wounds are two distinct yet potentially serious conditions that affect the feet, often requiring specialized medical attention from a podiatrist. Pressure injuries, commonly known as bed sores or ulcers, develop due to prolonged pressure on specific areas of the body, typically seen in individuals who are immobile or bedridden. They often occur on bony prominences, such as the heels, ankles, or toes, and lead to tissue damage and open wounds. Diabetic foot wounds are a consequence of diabetes-related complications, including peripheral neuropathy and impaired circulation. These wounds typically appear as ulcers, blisters, or cuts and are slow to heal due to poor blood flow and reduced sensation in the feet. Diagnosing these conditions involves careful examination, often including assessment of wound size, depth, and surrounding tissue condition. Prompt intervention is imperative to prevent complications like infection or tissue necrosis. If you have a foot wound or ulcer, it is strongly suggested that you seek immediate evaluation and treatment from a podiatrist to prevent further complications and promote healing.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Comprehensive Footcare Clinic - Hawaii. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Honolulu, HI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 04 June 2024 00:00

Cracked heels occur when the skin on the heels becomes dry, thickened, and fissured, often leading to discomfort and cosmetic concerns. This condition, medically known as heel fissures, can result from various factors, including dehydration, prolonged standing, wearing open-back shoes, or inadequate foot care. The skin on the heels lacks oil glands, making it prone to dryness and cracking, especially in dry climates or during colder months. To prevent cracked heels, it is essential to maintain proper foot hygiene by regularly moisturizing the heels with a hydrating foot cream or lotion. Exfoliating the heels gently to remove dead skin buildup and wearing supportive footwear that protects the heels can also help prevent the formation of cracks. Additionally, staying hydrated, maintaining a balanced diet rich in vitamins and minerals, and avoiding excessive standing or walking barefoot can contribute to overall foot health and prevent cracked heels from developing. Cracked heels can be painful. If you have developed this foot condition, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can offer you effective treatment methods, which may include prescribed medication.

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists from Comprehensive Footcare Clinic - Hawaii. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Honolulu, HI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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